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November 29, 2004

Comments

ben wolfson

Here's a quotation from Rasselas that the first third or so of the post reminded me of (plus I just read it this morning):

"The business of a poet", said Imlac, "is to examine not the individual, but the species; to remark general properties and large appearances. He does not number the streaks of the tulip, or describe the different shades in the verdure of the forest; he is to exhibit in his portraits of nature such prominent and striking features as recall the original to every mind, and must neglect the minuter discriminations, which one may have remarked and another have neglected, for those characteristics which are alike obvious to vigilance and carelessness."

bob mcmanus

Art Renewal Center doesn't appear to accept hotlinks, or I am doing something wrong. So you have to cut and paste. I know nothing about graphic novels, but these seemed relevant to a discussion of the presentation of visual information. Was looking for a particular neat vision, Reni or Perugino or somebody but I could not find it. Raphael and Rubens are also sometimes, umm, busy.

http://www.artrenewal.org/images/artists/l/lotto_lorenzo/large/Lotto_Lorenzo_Stories_of_St_Barbara_1524.jpg
....
http://www.artrenewal.org/images/artists/m/memling_hans/large/Memling_Hans_Advent_and_Triumph_of_Christ_1480.jpg

As far as literature, as a Joyce fan, he played all these games of commission and omission on every page:puzzles, over and under description, the informing and misleading visual and sculptural presentation of words on the page. Hypertextually questioning what writing and reading are. After Finnegans Wake, I no longer even understand what thing a damn "word" is. Except a subvocalisation with an emotional resonance.

bob mcmanus

http://www.artrenewal.org/images/artists/m/memling_hans/large/

Memling_Hans_Advent_and_Triumph_of_Christ_1480.jpg

http://www.artrenewal.org/images/artists/l/lotto_lorenzo/large/

Lotto_Lorenzo_Stories_of_St_Barbara_1524.jpg

Mitch Mills

I come from a family of high accuracy, high-speed typists. My dad got a medal for accuracy in the army.

Odd that you haven't been drafted into the 101st Fighting Keyboarders then.

Keith

I've met Jim Woodring and talked to him about his work (in a seminar at my undergrad, where I recieved a degree in Comic Books. Another story) He really is just a big fan of weird for the sake of weird. And his artwork isn't nearly as simple as it looks. All those squiggly lines that add texture to the sky in a lot of the 'Frank' stories aren't just squiggly lines. They are elaborate sentences-- actual words, scribbled in the sky. It's easier to see this in the original art, at full size than the shrunk down printed version but it's still there. Amazingly stuff that is compex and simple at the same time. A Lot like Nabakov, actally.

Ray Davis

Assuming I can take you at fast-typing word ('cause god knows [and will damn me for it] the faster I talk the less I remember the promises I made or implied): "What do you think? Is literature more like a tune you play or a puzzle-box you turn every which way?"

There's been some wonderful research done over the decades on reading patterns, and science (like experience) bears Nabokov out: we do not read linearly. We skip, hop, pirouette, glom, spit, and rub purringly across the text.

BUT: that makes text neither necessarily a play or a puzzle box. It makes text capable of either or both together. (And makes hypertext's "you must make a decision before we will again allow you to dart freely" approach much more fascistic than any text could possibly be.)

My own favorite Ware remains the serial lyric of the cat-head comix. Woodring and French are both great. I'm typing fast too, for whatever that information's worth.

Melanie Stephan

Hi John and Belle, This is an important News Update for you, please read and pass it along. God has made contact. The message is about Revelation. The message is from God, Jesus and the Holy Ghost respectively. It was sent in the Spring of 2006. It is about the meaning of First is Last and Last is First . The message is this: In the morning I go to Heaven. In the afternoon I live my life. In the evening I die, death. What does this mean? In other words this means Birth is Last and Last is Birth. To understand this don’t think from point A to point B. Think of this as a continous circle of life. Birth is First, Life, Death, Birth is Last, completing the circle. God also said that Judgment will be before Birth in Heaven. As birth on Earth is painful so will birth in Heaven. It is possible that this message was delivered by one of God’s Angels in the Spring of 2006. Yes, God has made contact and he sent a messenger. Spread this message along, just like a chain letter. Tell two people. OH, one more thing of interest. Did you know that Mike Douglas died on his birthday. Melanie Stephan

Ameda

Talking of fast typing I don't think there would be any match of my hubby, he's incredibly fast!

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